COLORADO Denver area pet and livestock owners warned about rabies

April 22, 2015

Denver-area pet and livestock owners warned about rabies uptick Denver-area livestock and pet owners should be alert to the possibility of rabies after skunk cases were found in Arapahoe, Adams and Elbert counties, according to Colorado agriculture and health officials. Rabies vaccination should be up to date, and pet owners and livestock producers should discuss any questions with a veterinarian. The Denver Post (4/20)

TEXAS resident sues SeaWorld in San Antonio federal court

April 22, 2015
http://www.mysanantonio.com/business/local/article/Texas-resident-sues-SeaWorld-in-S-A-federal-court-6211556.php

Texas resident sues SeaWorld in S.A. federal court By Patrick Danner : April 20, 2015 : Updated: April 20, 2015 1:16pm

A lawsuit has been filed in San Antonio federal court by a Texas resident. The suit alleges SeaWorld and related entities have violated state law by disseminating false information regarding the health and well-being of the whales at its San Antonio park. Photo: Express-News

Litigation is mounting against SeaWorld Entertainment Inc. over its treatment of its killer whales at its theme parks.

The latest suit was filed Friday in San Antonio federal court by a Texas resident who alleges SeaWorld and related entities have violated state law by disseminating false information regarding the health and well-being of the whales at its San Antonio park.

Three similar lawsuits have been filed in recent weeks in federal courts in San Diego, California, and Orlando, Florida, where the company is based.

The San Antonio suit seeks certification as a class-action and unspecified financial damages from the company.

pdanner@express-news.net

pain relief cream meant for humans proves deadly for cats

April 21, 2015

Pain relief cream meant for humans proves deadly for cat

Five cats became seriously ill and three of them died after being exposed to their owners’ pain relief cream. Two developed kidney failure and recovered after receiving veterinary treatment, but the cats that died had high levels of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen in their systems, according to necropsy results. The owners reported using the cream to treat themselves for arthritis pain; they never directly administered the medication to the cats. According to the AVMA, ibuprofen is the human drug pets most commonly ingest. National Public Radio/Shots blog (4/20)

MISSISSIPPI HSUS says monkey business at labs and roadside zoos must end

April 21, 2015

Monkey Business at Labs and Roadside Zoos Must End
By Wayne Pacelle on April 20, 2015 with 6 Comments

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The HSUS’ undercover investigations have revealed primates in psychological distress at research facilities and roadside zoos, and it’s time to do something comprehensive about the problem. Today, we submitted a legal petition to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) asking the agency to provide regulatory guidance directing research facilities, exhibitors, and dealers that breed and use primates on how the animals should be properly housed and cared for, since the current plan isn’t working and primates are suffering.

For example, at a laboratory in Louisiana, we saw primates engaging in self-mutilation due to extreme stress, tearing at gaping wounds in their arms and legs. At Texas Biomedical Research Institute, we documented abnormally high levels of aggression in primates kept in poorly managed social groups. At a roadside attraction in Collins, Miss., we found a monkey living alone in a barren enclosure, pacing incessantly due to boredom and anxiety. And at the unaccredited Natural Bridge Zoo, whose permit was recently suspended by the state of Virginia, our investigator witnessed newborn monkeys being taken away from their frantic mothers to be sold into the exotic pet trade.

The USDA has a legal responsibility to provide oversight of care of primates — 30 years ago, Congress amended the Animal Welfare Act to specifically require that monkeys and apes, including chimpanzees, macaques, capuchins, and marmosets, be provided with enriched environments to promote the “psychological wellbeing” of these highly intelligent creatures. Over 100,000 primates are kept in laboratories and exhibition facilities in the United States. But the USDA’s regulations have long failed to prevent unnecessary suffering in captive primates and the agency’s own inspectors called for guidance over 15 years ago, conceding that current regulations are too difficult to enforce.

Central to this essential reform is the need to prohibit the premature separation of mothers and infants, which experts agree causes long-term behavioral abnormalities and even changes the structure of an infant primate’s brain. We don’t doubt the importance of the maternal bond and social development in our own species, and we shouldn’t be surprised that disregarding the similar needs of our primate cousins leads to significant psychological distress.

The USDA is responsible for setting minimum standards to ensure the welfare of captive primates, and the action requested in our petition is long overdue. The National Institutes of Health recently instituted new requirements for keeping captive chimpanzees in ethologically appropriate environments, and the USDA should follow that example to develop meaningful criteria to improve the lives of captive primates.

KANSAS experts report increase in rabies, urge vaccination

April 20, 2015

Kan. experts report increase in rabies, urge vaccination Rabies in animals is up this year, compared with last year, according to Rolan Davis at Kansas State University. Most of the 28 confirmed rabies cases in the first three months of 2015 were seen in skunks, but a cow, a fox and three cats also tested positive. There were 10 cases during the same period last year. Veterinarians encourage rabies vaccinations for pets as the best way to protect animals and people from the deadly zoonotic disease. The Bellingham Herald (Wash.)/The Associated Press

COLORADO DA running in Denver animal protectionist

April 18, 2015

http://blogs.denverpost.com/thespot/2015/04/17/beth-mccann-for-denver-da/118981/

Democrat Rep. Beth McCann, who is running for Denver DA, got a public endorsement Wednesday from a Republican who is her ally on pet issues at the Capitol.
It shouldn’t be that surprising that Sen. David Balmer of Centennial touted McCann because she’s the underdog in the race and Balmer is obsessed with four-legged friends. They two also are the co-chairs of the Colorado Legislative Animal Welfare Caucus, better known as the CLAW Caucus.
“Having worked closely with Beth on animal protection issues, I profoundly respect her work ethic and professionalism,” Balmer said afterward, when asked about the endorsement.

TEXAS State aquarium suffered widespread animal loses

April 17. 2015

http://www.discovery.com/dscovrd/wildlife/texas-aquarium-suffers-devastating-animal-losses-after-medication-backfires/

http://tinyurl.com/p72jnhh

Philip Lange/Thinkstock

The Texas State Aquarium suffered widespread animal losses after a parasite treatment backfired on Wednesday, according to a statement. A common medication caused an adverse reaction in many of the animals, and “considerable losses” were sustained.

“This is a very sad day at the Texas State Aquarium,” remarked CMO Richard E. Glover, Jr. “We are working diligently to find out what caused the adverse reaction, and we will keep the public informed with any updates.”

Aquarium staff previously tested the treatment on a smaller exhibit and reported no adverse reactions. Water samples are currently being evaluated by a third-party laboratory to determine exactly what caused the animal deaths.

At press time, it was not immediately clear either which parasite was being treated or which medication was being used.

State Aquarium statement at link

TENNESSEE activists push for passage of animal rights bill

April 15. 2015
http://www.myfoxmemphis.com/story/28800854/activists-push-for-passage-of-tn-animal-rights-bills

http://tinyurl.com/p7k6nvu

Posted: Apr 14, 2015 2:55 PM EST
Updated: Apr 14, 2015 3:06 PM EST
By Greg Coy, Anchor

Animal rights activists are in Nashville to help get two bills passed that will toughen penalties against convicted abusers.

One bill if passed would create a registry for animal abusers. The measure has passed the Senate and is waiting for action in the House.
This bill would create a statewide registry to hopefully stop people convicted of animal abuse from adopting a dog or cat.

Already passed in the Senate, if it passes the House and signed by Gov.
Bill Haslam, Tennessee would be one of only two states in the nation with such a registry.

“No wants to give a dog, adopt a dog or rehome a dog to anyone who is going to abuse this dog,” said Sylvia Cox of Save Our Shelters. “Just like a sex offender registry, all you would have to do is Google it and it should come up for you.”

FOX13 News checked the Tennessee General Assembly website to see what this registry would do. It would post a convicted abusers name, photograph and other information deemed necessary by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigators on a site the public can access…..

Why cats need to play and how to handle dogs’ ear hair

April 13, 2015

How to handle dogs’ ear hair and why cats need to play Veterinarian Lee Pickett explains a split among veterinarians regarding how to handle ear hair in dogs — some say it’s OK to remove by plucking because that may reduce problems, while others think plucking causes inflammation that can lead to infection. Regardless, a dog that is scratching excessively should be seen by a veterinarian to determine the cause. Also, Dr. Pickett addresses a cat question, writing that cats whose owners play with them for at least five minutes per day have fewer behavioral problems than cats that get one minute of play per day. BerksPets.com (Reading, Pa.) (4/10)

Invasive Bufo toads can be deadly for pets

April 13 2015

Invasive Bufo toads can be deadly for pets Dogs and cats that have contact with Bufo toads, which live in but are not native to Florida, can die without treatment. Glands in the toad’s neck release a poison, and licking or even just sniffing it can be dangerous. Treatment is usually successful if initiated quickly. Veterinarians and wildlife experts say owners who suspect their pet has been exposed to the toad, also known as a cane toad, should run water through the side of the animal’s mouth so it pours out of the mouth and not down the throat, then seek immediate veterinary care. WPBF-TV (Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.) (4/9), WFTS-TV (Tampa, Fla.) (4/9), The Palm Beach Post (Fla.) (free content) (4/10)