expert panel describes signs of pain in cats

February 29, 2016

Expert panel describes signs of pain in cats

A group of veterinary experts published a list of 25 signs of pain in domestic cats, the first consensus statement on the topic. The group evaluated behavioral cues in cats and developed a list of 91 behaviors that could signal pain, then narrowed it down to 25. Signs of problems include absence of grooming, abnormal gait, reluctance to move, avoidance of bright areas, change in feeding behavior and jumping difficulty. The information, published in PLOS One, is expected to help owners and veterinarians. The Independent (London) (tiered subscription model) (2/27)

cats and caregivers targeted in hawaii

February 29, 2016
http://www.voxfelina.com/2016/02/cats-and-caregivers-targeted-in-hawaii/

Cats and Caregivers Targeted in Hawaii > Vox Felina
…<http://www.voxfelina.com/2016/02/cats-and-caregivers-targeted-in-hawaii/
>
www.voxfelina.com
A pair of bills winding their way through Hawaii’s legislature threaten
community cats, their caregivers-and the very wildlife some supporters claim
they’re …

animal abuse is a felony. what is abuse?

February 29, 2016

http://beefmagazine.com/blog/should-animal-abuse-be-class-felony-and-who-defines-abuse

Livestock owners, pet lovers and animal enthusiasts beware — animal cruelty is now considered a Class A felony, and the FBI has agreed to elevate the status of this crime to its own category and will track this data just as they do for other serious crimes like homicides.
At first glance, this might seem like progress in animal welfare and care. After all, we certainly don’t want people who purposely abuse their animals to go unpunished. It’s been shown that many of the most violent criminals began their series of abuse with animals before moving onto people. So yes, in those extreme cases, I can see how this could be beneficial information to have.
However, what concerns me is this: Who is defining “abuse?

second hand smoke dangerous for pets too

February 29, 2016

Secondhand smoke: Dangerous for pets, too

Owners who smoke put their pets at risk for serious, life-threatening illnesses such as asthma and cancer, and one US group’s new ad exposes that truth. Feline and canine lungs are similar to those of humans, so it’s not surprising that companion animals are at risk of health consequences when their humans smoke, says veterinarian Elisabeth Snead. But she said people who may not be motivated to quit for their own health could find inspiration in their pets. A new US ad campaign is capitalizing on that idea, warning of “CATmageddon.” CBC.ca (Canada) (2/27)

studies examine different dialects in animals

February 29, 2016

Studies examine different dialects in animals
Recent studies show that various creatures, from sperm whales to wolves, have unique regional dialects. One study looks at sperm whales in the Caribbean; another analyzes the howls of wolves, dogs and coyotes. All can help humans discover more about how our own language evolved. “One of the few ways to examine language evolution is to look at the role that communication plays in other, less related but more vocal, species,” said Arik Kershenbaum, leader of the howling study. National Geographic News (free registration) (2/27)

OKLAHOMA stands up to HSUS on House Floor.

February 20, 2016

WAY TO GO OK…………………

recording at site. Applause during speech regarding HSUS.

http://www.oklahomafarmreport.com/wire/news/2016/02/01225_ScottBiggsReactEdm
ondsonLetter02192016_055606.php#.VsfxS_krKc0

Oklahoma State Representative Scott Biggs Responds to Charges of Lying by
Drew Edmondson and HSUS Fri, 19 Feb 2016 05:57:02 CST

Yesterday morning, State Representative Scott Biggs was granted time to take
a moment of personal priviledge on the Oklahoma House Floor to address what
he calls “the recent attacks of Drew Edmondson and HSUS.”

Biggs told House members that earlier in the week, he and Representative
Brian Renegar received a letter from former Attorney General Drew Edmondson
that scolded the lawmakers over what the former AG called false statements
in support of House Bill 2250 in a News Release.

Edmondson claimed the statements that HSUS raised about a million dollars
from Oklahomans after the group used the Moore tornado as a reason to ask
donors to help- and then spent only about a tenth of that actually helping
animals in the state in the aftermath of the tornado were a lie.

Edmondson went on to say in the letter (pictured here) that the HSUS
advertising after the Moore tornado “did not use the Moore tornado or
promised relief from the Moore tornado.”

In his comments on the floor, Biggs responded by saying that HSUS did make
reference to the Moore tornado in their solicitations to donors. He cited an
email sent after the tornado that talked about the plight of animals after
the tornado- and then later asked for money.

Biggs also cited testimony given by HSUS to Congress after the tornado about
the amount of money given to the organization in that time frame- an amount
that exceeded $1.7 million dollars. Biggs told his colleagues that the HSUS
then spent $110,000 of that money on animals and shelters in the region.

He did not reference HB2250 or the news release that Edmondson based his
comments on- but Biggs did ask lawmakers to “stand up with other members and
tell Drew Edmondson that the Oklahoma House of Representatives will not
tolerate threatening letters and veiled attempts to silence legislation that
seeks to protect Oklahomans.

Biggs added “Stand up to the Washington, DC outfit that is HSUS and tell
them that the Oklahoma House of Representatives will not give in to their
bullying tactics, their threats of lawsuits and their demands to the members
of this House who are excersizing our Constitutional priviledge to defend
the Constitution of this state for the betterment of the citizens of
Oklahoma.”

Click on the LISTEN BAR below to listen to the remarks offered by Scott
Biggs on the House floor on Thursday.

Dealing with a flaky cat

February 18, 2016

Dealing with a flaky cat
White flakes may be present on cats for various reasons, writes veterinarian Francine Rattner, who explains that dandruff is more common in indoor cats in colder climates. Dr. Rattner suggests a veterinary exam and tests to rule out infectious causes of dandruff, some of which could be contagious to people. Further tests and dietary changes may be needed to resolve the issue. Capital Gazette (Annapolis, Md.) (2/16)

Understanding pancreatitis in pets

February 17, 2016

Understanding pancreatitis in pets
Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas, an organ in the abdomen that releases insulin and digestive enzymes, writes veterinarian Julianne Miller. In dogs, fatty meals can induce pancreatitis, but in cats, the cause is often unclear. Pancreatitis is potentially deadly and must be aggressively treated with pain drugs and anti-nausea medication, as well as fluids and fasting, according to Dr. Miller. Arizona Daily Sun (Flagstaff) (2/15)

Does this aging cat have arthritis?

February 17, 2016

Does this aging cat have arthritis?
Veterinarian Jeff Kahler writes that a 12-year-old cat that seems to be slowing down and having trouble jumping onto furniture may have arthritis, but other problems should be ruled out before treatment begins. Dr. Kahler says the cat needs a veterinary exam, possibly X-rays, blood work and possibly other tests, too. If it turns out the cat does have arthritis, joint supplements and possibly steroids may help. The pain drugs used to treat dogs aren’t safe in cats. The Modesto Bee (Calif.) (2/15)