study looks for patterns, differences in feline vocalizations

March 31, 2016

Study looks for patterns, differences in feline vocalizations

Researchers in Sweden hope to determine whether cats from different areas have differences in their vocalizations, similar to human accents. Previous studies have shown birds and whales of the same species but different geographic areas vocalize differently. The researchers also aim to catalog cat vocalizations and determine whether certain sounds are used in similar situations by all cats.

Newsweek (3/29)

KANSAS Friends of Animals will not drop lawsuit

March 31, 2016

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/mar/30/zoos-feds-as-court-to-dismiss-elephant-importation/

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) – Federal wildlife officials and three U.S. zoos want a judge to drop a lawsuit against the recent importation of African elephants.
The Wichita Eagle (http://bit.ly/1UUBWMT ) reports that in a motion to dismiss the case, the zoos said legal concerns about the permit process were irrelevant because the 17 elephants were flown from Swaziland to the U.S. earlier this month. The zoos are in Wichita, Kansas; Omaha, Nebraska; and Dallas.

Friends of Animals sued in February to stop the proposed importation, alleging that the government violated the law by approving the importation. The animal rights group hasn’t dropped the lawsuit, saying it needs to prevent future importations.

The Connecticut-based nonprofit, as well as other conservationists and animal-rights supporters, opposes the importation of the elephants to zoos in Wichita, Dallas and Omaha because they’re highly intelligent, migratory animals.
Friends of Animals was awaiting a hearing on a preliminary injunction in March when it heard that the move had already started. A judge denied the group’s last-minute request for a restraining order to stop the transfer in the middle of the process.
“These elephants were whisked away at midnight just days before a judge could hear our case,” said Priscilla Feral, the group’s president. “It was a sleazy deal.”

Tiny cat’s treatment drums up support for Purdue U teaching hospital

March 24,2016

Tiny cat’s treatment drums up support for Purdue U teaching hospital

Purdue University veterinarians successfully treated the fractured elbow of Lil Bub, a feline Internet phenom with with dwarfism, polydactyly and osteoporosis. Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff plan to expand surgical services for smaller dogs and cats, as well wild and exotic animals, and Lil Bub’s Internet stardom is helping Purdue raise funds to stock up on the unique tools veterinarians will need. The Indianapolis Star (tiered subscription model) (3/23)

causes of renal failure in a young cat

March 16, 2016

Causes of renal failure in a young cat
Veterinarian Francine Rattner explains how a young cat could develop kidney failure. Toxins including antifreeze and rat poison, medications such as ibuprofen, infectious diseases and congenital problems can all cause kidney problems in a young animal. Depending on the cause, treatment may be able to reverse the kidney failure, but chronic cases are more difficult to manage. Capital Gazette (Annapolis, Md.) (3/15)

KANSAS lab logs uptick in rabid cattle

March 16, 2016

Kan. lab logs uptick in rabid cattle
Cats are the domestic animal most often infected with rabies in the Midwest, but for the past two years in Kansas, the disease has become an issue in cattle. Kansas State University’s veterinary diagnostic lab has seen 13 bovine cases of rabies this year, more than any other domestic animal. Rabies in cattle may present as the furious form, in which cattle attack objects and people, or the dumb form, where cattle stand alone, seem confused and drool, veterinarian Gregg Hanzlicek said. Producers mistakenly think something is lodged in the animal’s throat and try to explore the oral cavity, exposing themselves to the disease. Cattle acting odd should be evaluated by a veterinarian. Farm & Ranch Guide (3/15)

swedish researchers launch human-cat communication study

March 14,2016

Swedish researchers launch human-cat communication study
Researchers in Sweden working on a five-year human-cat communication study will compare sounds made by cats living in Stockholm with those living in Lund, where the dialects are different. Researchers will compare the intonation patterns, voices and speaking styles people use to speak to cats and cat vocalizations in different situations when they communicate with people. The researchers will also study whether cats react differently to different voices, speaking styles and intonations. PhysOrg.com (3/10)

Cats are more like people than some may think

March 11, 2016

Cats are more like people than some may think

Findings from nearly 3,000 cat personality assessments show that cats have five primary personality traits: skittishness, outgoingness, dominance, spontaneity and friendliness, researchers in Australia say. The traits correlate to human personality traits of neuroticism, akin to skittishness; extroversion, similar to outgoingness; and agreeability, which is like friendliness. The Cat Tracker project involves answering 52 questions and is ongoing. The Advertiser (Adelaide, Australia) (3/9)

OKLAHOMA shame and blame over SB2250

March 10, 2016
http://www.tulsaworld.com/opinion/editorials/tulsa-world-editorial-unamerican-bill-targets-animal-rights-groups/article_a4e4941d-c744-52c7-b941-c5169d80b1b2.html

Posted: Thursday, March 10, 2016 12:00 am | Updated: 1:18 am, Thu Mar 10, 2016.
By World’s Editorial Writers | 0 comments

The Oklahoma House of Representatives is seeking to stifle free speech, and it ought to be ashamed of itself.
Earlier this month, on a 56-26 vote, the House approved House Bill 2250, which would prohibit animal rights charitable organizations from raising money for political purposes. The bill by Rep. Brian Renegar, D-McAlester, also would prohibit the groups, such as the Humane Society USA, from raising money in Oklahoma for any purpose outside the state.

It stems from a disputed series of events involving the humane society following the 2013 Moore tornado, but what happened then isn’t important. What’s important is what the Legislature is trying to do, which is just plain wrong.

If it’s not clear why it’s wrong, take out the phrase “animal rights charitable organization” in the bill’s language and insert some cause you support. Imagine if the Legislature tried to ban the National Rifle Association or the Democratic Party from raising money for political purposes. Imagine if the state tried to ban the American Cancer Society or the American Red Cross from raising money in Oklahoma for programs in other states.

It’s ridiculous. It’s wrong. It’s un-American.