TENNESSEE HES of Chattanooga to receive animals rescued from extreme hoarding case in Arkansas

July 30, 2016

TENNESSEE HES of Chattanooga to receive animals rescued from extreme hoarding case in Arkansas
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HES of Chattanooga to receive animals rescued from extreme hoarding case in Arkansas

CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee (WDEF) – 11 of 46 dogs rescued from what has been described as an extreme case of hoarding in Arkansas are being transported to the Humane Educational Society of Chattanooga.
HES of Chattanooga is an emergency placement partner of the United States Humane Educational Society. According to HES of Chattanooga Executive Director, Bob Citrullo, The US Humane Educational Society reached out to Chattanooga for help after assisting with the removal of 46 dogs from a property in Jefferson County Arkansas.
According to authorities, those dogs were in terrible shape.
“Loss of hair, not social, very sick and full of parasites; you name it and they’ve got it. We’ve agreed with HSUS to take in 11 of the 46 dogs. We’ve had a very good success rate over the last handful of years working with these types of animals,” Citrullo said.
A year and a half ago, the Chattanooga HES was asked to get involved with an animal rescue in Sequatchie County that also involved animals in very bad condition.
“All of those animals were adopted. The last two dogs took us up to 18 months to get them placed but we did very good,” Citrullo said.
Citrullo’s goal is to repeat that success when the Arkansas dogs arrive by not only taking care of medically but also rehabbing the animals and eventually finding them new homes.
The dogs are expected to arrive in Chattanooga on Tuesday. Citrullo told News 12 there will be a media event planned to welcome the animals as they arrive and to generate enough interest in people who may want to adopt the animals.

Cat recovering after mistakenly being washed in washing machine

July 29,2016

Cat recovering after mistakenly being washed in washing machine

Bobby, a 9-month-old cat, is lucky to be alive after his owner inadvertently started the washing machine with Bobby inside. Owner Lisa Keefe says the cat has a habit of getting into the machine. Veterinarian Tamsin Thomas treated Bobby, who recovered with supportive care.

The Irish Times (Dublin)/The Press Association (U.K.) (7/28)

Aging cat’s weight loss could indicate disease

July 29, 2016

 

Aging cat’s weight loss could indicate disease

Although cats may slim down somewhat as they age, significant weight loss could indicate an underlying illness, according to veterinarian Francine Rattner. Hyperthyroidism, diabetes and kidney disease can all cause weight loss and should be investigated by a veterinarian after less serious causes such as internal parasites are ruled out.

Capital Gazette (Annapolis, Md.) (7/26)

 

WYOMING animal laboratory renovated to handle higher-level biosafety threats

July 28, 2016

Wyo. animal laboratory renovated to handle higher-level biosafety threats

Renovations are underway at the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory to facilitate easier, safer handling of high-risk pathogens such as those that cause rabies, brucellosis and plague. Veterinarian William Laegreid, director of the lab, says the staff routinely process samples that may involve serious pathogens, virtually halting normal lab activities because high-risk cases require use of biohazard suits and decontamination after testing.

Star-Tribune (Casper, Wyo.) (tiered subscription model) (7/25)

Trial seeks to optimize radioiodine dose for feline hyperthyroidism

July 27, 2016

Trial seeks to optimize radioiodine dose for feline hyperthyroidism

The Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech has teamed up with VCA Veterinary Referral Associates in Gaithersburg, Md., on parallel studies using scintigraphy to customize radioiodine dose for cats with overactive thyroid glands. The goal is to identify the range of doses that produces the best effects in cats, recognizing that standard dosing is too much for some cats and too little for others. The partnership is part of the Collaborative Research Network, which links area practices with the veterinary college for research.

TEXAS A&M Getting to the bottom of skin problems in dogs

July 26, 2016

Getting to the bottom of skin problems in dogs

 

Veterinarian Alison Diesel, a clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, says that pet skin problems could belie more serious underlying conditions, so they should be fully investigated by a veterinarian. Fleas, mites, lice and other parasites are main causes of itchy pets, but hormone imbalances, cancer and autoimmune diseases may also be culprits.

New Castle News (Pa.)/Texas A&M University (7/25)

Why feline insulin needs fluctuate in diabetes

July 25, 2016

Why feline insulin needs fluctuate in diabetes

Veterinarian Dara Zerrenner explains that diabetic cats may stop requiring insulin only to need it again later. Cats usually get type 2 diabetes, in which their insulin production is normal but their body becomes resistant to its effects, and diet and exercise may obviate the need for insulin. Some diabetic cats will come out of remission and again require insulin, so regular veterinary blood sugar checks are necessary.

The Record (Woodland Park, N.J.) (7/23)

How to CT scan a cat

July 25, 2016

How to CT scan a cat

High-tech diagnostics and treatment are part of cancer care at the Animal Medical Center in New York, where one cat’s case is documented in this story providing an inside look at an animal CT scan. Animals are usually anesthetized to prevent movement during the scan and get the best quality images, and they must be carefully prepared for and placed in the machine for safe, medically appropriate imaging.

Tech Insider (7/23)

Veterinarian develops new twist on feeding cats

July 25, 2016

Veterinarian develops new twist on feeding cats

Veterinarian Liz Bales created the NoBowl Feeding System, a new method of feeding cats that abandons bowls and instead includes five small containers owners can stuff with cat food and place around the house for cats to hunt. The containers resemble mice, and the system is designed to work with a cat’s instinctual eating behavior by encouraging them to seek food, bat the containers around and chase down the dispersed pieces.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (7/23)

TENNESSEE Nashville pets OK to get rabies vaccine every 3 years under new rule

July 22, 2016

TENNESSEE Nashville pets OK to get rabies vaccine every 3 years under new rule

Beginning Jan. 1, Nashville dog and cat owners will be legally allowed to have pets vaccinated against rabies every three years instead of annually. Veterinarians may still give yearly rabies vaccines.

WTVF-TV (Nashville, Tenn.) (7/20)