FDA warns about false cancer treatment claims

April 27, 2017

FDA warns about false cancer treatment claims

The FDA warned 14 companies to retract false claims that their vegetable extracts, teas, creams and other products diagnose or treat cancer in people and pets. Officials said the agency is increasingly seeing bogus products pitched to dog and cat owners as cures for cancer, but untested products could be unsafe and prevent pets or people from receiving lifesaving medical care.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (4/25),  PhillyVoice (Philadelphia) (4/25)

TEXAS Veterinarian, genomics pioneer’s cloned cat turns 15

April 25, 2017

TEXAS Veterinarian, genomics pioneer’s cloned cat turns 15

Recently retired Texas A&M Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Science veterinarian Duane Kraemer and his team were the first scientists in the world to clone a cat, and the animal is now 15 and has had a litter of her own. Dean of Veterinary Medicine Eleanor Green said Dr. Kraemer has been a pioneer in his field, helping to pave the way for advances in genomics and reproductive biology.

The Bryan-College Station Eagle (Texas) (4/21)

OKLAHOMA veterinarians warn cat owners about bobcat fever tick disease

April 24, 2017

OKLAHOMA  veterinarians warn cat owners about bobcat fever tick disease

Oklahoma State University veterinarian Laura Nafe says cat owners can protect their cats from bobcat fever by using appropriate tick prevention, which is far cheaper and more effective than treating disease once infection has occurred. Veterinarian Laura Denton said she’s aware of at least five cases of bobcat fever so far this year in her area.

KWTV-TV (Oklahoma City) (4/20)

TEXAS legislation regarding BESTALITY

April 18, 2017

TEXAS legislation regarding BESTALITY

HB1087  –  http://www.legis.state.tx.us/BillLookup/Actions.aspx?LegSess=85R&Bill=HB1087

SB1232  –  http://www.legis.state.tx.us/BillLookup/History.aspx?LegSess=85R&Bill=SB1232

 

I have checked the text of both bills – the following is in the latest versions in/out of committee that I can find.

 

HB1087 Penal Code amendment

Sec. A 21.09.BESTIALITY. (a) A person commits an offense if the person knowingly:

(1)engages in an act involving contact between:

…..

(2)fondles or touches the anus or genitals of an animal, including touching through clothing

 

…It is a state jail felony offense under this act

 

…it is a defense to prosecution under this act that the conduct the actor is engaged in is a generally accepted and otherwise lawful animal husbandry or veterinary practice.

 

So if I carry my dog, dog sits on my lap, lays on my chest, sits on my leg, or if I lift my dog in and out of a car/truck/boat, scratch a male dog’s belly, wrestling, and even some trick training, I may be committing a felony under HB1087/SB1232.

 

Are there generally accepted animal husbandry practices for pets(thought animal husbandry was for livestock)? I sure hope that involves –

  1. Washing – I don’t not washALL OF MY dogs body – genitals included – so I knowingly touch them to wash them
  2. Grooming, clipping, especially sanitary clips – I sometimes trim my dogs hair for dog shows and yes that includes trimming around their genitals – male & female
  3. Performing mole, tick or flea checks – fleas & ticks don’t know about the genital area being forbidden so they go there which requires me to touch the genital area to remove and kill them.
  4. Collecting urine samples prior to a vet visit
  5. Applying medications to kill parasites – all over the animals body including genitals

 

While the statute requires you to knowingly touch, it is the definition of knowingly that is problematic. Tex Penal Code 6.03(B) A person acts knowingly…when he is aware of the nature of his conduct or that the circumstances exist. …when he is aware that his conduct is reasonably certain to cause the result.

 

Obviously a defendant under this proposed statute is going to argue the conduct was not knowingly. And is going to use the defense of animal husbandry or veterinary practice, but why do we need to get to this point?

 

I’d say if your dog sits on you, the result is a felonious touching. Likewise, if  you wrestle, carry, or lift a dog, you know you are reasonably certain to touch your animal’s genitals. You’re not fondling them. It’s just a likely result of interacting with the dog. When a male dog roles over for belly love, it is not unusual to place your hand in the wrong place, or for the dog to move. You KNOW it’s likely to happen. The conduct seems accidental, but under the law when you are aware that your conduct is reasonably certain to cause the result (in this case touching), you knowingly commit the act.

 

Let’s not forget that the defense to the felony (animal husbandry or veterinary practice) has to be proven.

 

I am totally against real bestiality that I would define as any sexual act between a person and animal.

But where did all this other come from?

Have we had an outbreak of real bestiality?

Don’t the Texas animal cruelty laws already address this?

 

If this passes to law you are taking away my ability to care for my animals under the threat of being charged with a felony  –

Not acceptable to me

I cannot live in Austin for the session and rely on my elected officials to keep me informed of legislation.

But this legislation has gone all the way thru hearings and out of committees without me being notified or able to respond.

 

I do hope some or all of you will respond to this email and kill this legislation that would punish me for taking care of and loving my animals.

 

NEW MEXICO Stray cat with plague prompts public health reminders

April 12, 2017

NEW MEXICO Stray cat with plague prompts public health reminders

A stray cat found in Albuquerque, N.M., died of plague, and public health officials are warning residents to avoid stray or sick animals. Mark DiMenna, deputy director of the city’s Environmental Health Department, asked to be notified about sick or dying animals, especially wildlife, and department officials are setting up traps to catch rodents and other animals that might be infected.

KOB-TV (Albuquerque, N.M.) (4/11),  KOAT-TV (Albuquerque, N.M.)/The Associated Press (4/10)

 

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

April 6, 2017

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

Researchers reported in Environmental Science & Technology that they found high levels of brominated flame retardants in the blood of house cats, and the finding suggests that young children are also at risk. The known endocrine disruptors, found in textiles, electronics and furniture, have been linked to thyroid disease and persist in house dust.

HealthDay News (4/4)

COLORADO Not your average hunting dogs

April 7. 2017

COLORADO Not your average hunting dogs

Two nationally certified wildlife law enforcement dogs help Colorado Parks and Wildlife agents investigate poaching, find probable cause for searches at checkpoints and sniff out species such as the black-footed ferret and boreal toad for biologists. The dogs’ sense of smell saves manpower and time by quickly pinpointing locations of interest.

The Reporter-Herald (Loveland, Colo.) (4/5)

LOUISIANA dog owners warned of stinging caterpillars

April 7. 2017

LOUISIANA dog owners warned of stinging caterpillars

Louisiana veterinarians say buck moth caterpillars are out in full force in some areas, and dog owners should keep an eye out for signs their animal has been stung. Some dogs don’t seem to experience pain from the caterpillar’s spines, according to veterinarian Audrey Hess, but for those that do, veterinarian Ashley Tahir suggests owners dab the area with tape to remove the spines, then apply ice to the area.

The Times-Picayune (New Orleans) (4/6)

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

April 6, 2017

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

Researchers reported in Environmental Science & Technology that they found high levels of brominated flame retardants in the blood of house cats, and the finding suggests that young children are also at risk. The known endocrine disruptors, found in textiles, electronics and furniture, have been linked to thyroid disease and persist in house dust.

HealthDay News (4/4)

Cat with mass presents tough choices

April 4, 2017

Cat with mass presents tough choices

Veterinarian John de Jong helps an owner navigate difficult choices regarding a cat’s intestinal mass, which biopsy results suggest could be cancerous with a poor prognosis. The location of the mass makes surgical access difficult, but Dr. de Jong suggests palliative treatment such as chemotherapy or prednisolone could help if surgery can’t.

Boston Herald (4/2)