Panleukopenia claims 50 cats at N.C. shelter

September 6, 2017

Panleukopenia claims 50 cats at N.C. shelter

At least 50 cats at a northeastern North Carolina animal shelter have died of panleukopenia since a kitten died of the disease in July. Kittens are especially susceptible to the virus, which spreads through feces, urine and bowls and is difficult to kill, said veterinarian Leigh Rigler, who has been helping the shelter diagnose and manage the virus.

WAVY-TV (Portsmouth, Va.) (9/5)

Persistent panting could be a sign of lung, heart disorder in cats

August 24, 2017

Persistent panting could be a sign of lung, heart disorder in cats

Some cats pant infrequently as a cooling mechanism or when they are anxious, but persistent panting can be a sign of congestive heart failure, allergic bronchitis, asthma and other disorders, says veterinarian Aimee Simpson, medical director of VCA Cat Hospital of Philadelphia. Cats whose panting is persistent should be examined by a veterinarian, who may order chest X-rays or perform an echocardiogram, Dr. Simpson says.

Catster (8/23)

Uterine infection is a serious condition in dogs, cats

August 22, 2017

Uterine infection is a serious condition in dogs, cats

Pyometra, or uterine infection, may become evident two to three months after a dog — or, rarely, a cat — has its last estrus, “and it is a true veterinary emergency,” said veterinarian Gary Brummet, chief of primary care service at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Pyometra occurs most frequently in intact dogs between 6 and 10 years old, can result in sepsis if untreated and is prevented only by spaying.

The News-Gazette (Champaign-Urbana, Ill.) (8/21)

Cat owners experience many health benefits People are increasingly discovering that pets provide them with emotional and physical health benefits, according to former AVMA President Dr. Douglas Aspros, and it is likely the stereotype of the “crazy cat lady” may soon be a thing of the past. Petting cats releases oxytocin, making people feel less stressed; the sound of a cat’s purr can lower blood pressure; cat owners have less risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke; cats’ companionship can reduce loneliness; and exposure early in life may prevent later pet allergies. NBC News (8/8)

August 10, 2017

Cat owners experience many health benefits

People are increasingly discovering that pets provide them with emotional and physical health benefits, according to former AVMA President Dr. Douglas Aspros, and it is likely the stereotype of the “crazy cat lady” may soon be a thing of the past. Petting cats releases oxytocin, making people feel less stressed; the sound of a cat’s purr can lower blood pressure; cat owners have less risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke; cats’ companionship can reduce loneliness; and exposure early in life may prevent later pet allergies.

NBC News (8/8)

What feline hyperthyroidism means for human health

May 22, 2017

What feline hyperthyroidism means for human health

Hyperthyroidism, now common in domestic cats, was unheard of in felines until the late 1970s, when veterinarian Mark Peterson noticed similarities between a patient’s symptoms and the signs of hyperthyroidism in humans. Veterinarians around the world began to diagnose the condition in cats while research was beginning to link the condition to fire retardants known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Because humans and cats live side by side, scientists are increasingly concerned that the feline disorder is a harbinger of a threat to human health, too.

The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (5/16)

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

May 12, 2017

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

the genomes of 50 cats, and they plan to continue until they’ve reached 99 felines, all in an effort to identify and prevent genetic diseases such as progressive retinal atrophy and Niemann-Pick disorder. “Continued collaboration with geneticists and veterinarians could lead to the rapid discovery of undiagnosed genetic conditions in cats,” said study lead Leslie Lyons, noting that testing can uncover conditions early, when they may be more readily treated.

The Kansas City Star (Mo.) (5/10)

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

May 12, 2017

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

the genomes of 50 cats, and they plan to continue until they’ve reached 99 felines, all in an effort to identify and prevent genetic diseases such as progressive retinal atrophy and Niemann-Pick disorder. “Continued collaboration with geneticists and veterinarians could lead to the rapid discovery of undiagnosed genetic conditions in cats,” said study lead Leslie Lyons, noting that testing can uncover conditions early, when they may be more readily treated.

The Kansas City Star (Mo.) (5/10)

FDA warns about false cancer treatment claims

April 27, 2017

FDA warns about false cancer treatment claims

The FDA warned 14 companies to retract false claims that their vegetable extracts, teas, creams and other products diagnose or treat cancer in people and pets. Officials said the agency is increasingly seeing bogus products pitched to dog and cat owners as cures for cancer, but untested products could be unsafe and prevent pets or people from receiving lifesaving medical care.

The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (4/25),  PhillyVoice (Philadelphia) (4/25)

NEW MEXICO Stray cat with plague prompts public health reminders

April 12, 2017

NEW MEXICO Stray cat with plague prompts public health reminders

A stray cat found in Albuquerque, N.M., died of plague, and public health officials are warning residents to avoid stray or sick animals. Mark DiMenna, deputy director of the city’s Environmental Health Department, asked to be notified about sick or dying animals, especially wildlife, and department officials are setting up traps to catch rodents and other animals that might be infected.

KOB-TV (Albuquerque, N.M.) (4/11),  KOAT-TV (Albuquerque, N.M.)/The Associated Press (4/10)

 

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

April 6, 2017

Cat study suggests children are at risk from residual flame retardants

Researchers reported in Environmental Science & Technology that they found high levels of brominated flame retardants in the blood of house cats, and the finding suggests that young children are also at risk. The known endocrine disruptors, found in textiles, electronics and furniture, have been linked to thyroid disease and persist in house dust.

HealthDay News (4/4)