FDA to issue new guidance on compounding drugs for animals

November 9, 2017

FDA to issue new guidance on compounding drugs for animals

The FDA withdrew draft guidance issued in May 2015 on compounding drugs for animals and intends to issue a new draft next year. The guidance proposed conditions under which drugs could be compounded from bulk ingredients to boost access without putting animal or human safety at risk or compromising the drug-approval process.

The Horse (11/7)

Why a veterinarian’s advice is needed before putting a fat cat on a diet

October 24, 2017

Why a veterinarian’s advice is needed before putting a fat cat on a diet

Obese cats that lose weight too quickly or without adequate dietary protein can develop hepatic lipidosis, says veterinarian Ken Lambrecht, who recommends asking a veterinarian for guidance. A veterinarian can develop a weight loss plan that includes healthy food options and quantities to take weight off an obese cat at a safe rate, Dr. Lambrecht says.

Catster (10/9)

Feline medical clinic expands treatment options for hyperthyroidism

October 19, 2017

Feline medical clinic expands treatment options for hyperthyroidism

The Cat Doctor, a feline medical center in Shreveport, La., is offering radioactive iodine therapy for cats with hyperthyroidism, says veterinarian Pamala Coker. Drugs are not always effective, and radioiodine therapy has roughly a 95% cure rate for the disease, Dr. Coker said.

KTBS-TV (Shreveport, La.) (9/27)

What feline hyperthyroidism means for human health

October 19, 2017

What feline hyperthyroidism means for human health

Hyperthyroidism, now common in domestic cats, was unheard of in felines until the late 1970s, when veterinarian Mark Peterson noticed similarities between a patient’s symptoms and the signs of hyperthyroidism in humans. Veterinarians around the world began to diagnose the condition in cats while research was beginning to link the condition to fire retardants known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Because humans and cats live side by side, scientists are increasingly concerned that the feline disorder is a harbinger of a threat to human health, too.

The New York Times  (5/16)

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

October 19, 2017

Feline genetic mapping could yield new treatment insights

University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine researchers mapped the genomes of 50 cats, and they plan to continue until they’ve reached 99 felines, all in an effort to identify and prevent genetic diseases such as progressive retinal atrophy and Niemann-Pick disorder. “Continued collaboration with geneticists and veterinarians could lead to the rapid discovery of undiagnosed genetic conditions in cats,” said study lead Leslie Lyons, noting that testing can uncover conditions early, when they may be more readily treated.

The Kansas City Star (Mo.)  (5/10)

Researchers ID genes linked to OCD in people, dogs and mice

October 19, 2017

Researchers ID genes linked to OCD in people, dogs and mice

A comparison of DNA from mice, dogs and people led to the identification of four genes linked to obsessive-compulsive disorder, researchers reported in Nature Communications. The findings may give researchers a better understanding of how OCD develops, says Dr. Marco Grados, a Johns Hopkins University OCD researcher who was not involved in the study.

National Public Radio (10/17)

ice

Initiative aims to fix misinformation about sInpaying cats

October 3, 2017

Initiative aims to fix misinformation about sInpaying cats

The AVMA is among the organizations endorsing the Feline Fix by Five campaign — an initiative to educate the public about the importance of spaying cats before they reach reproductive age. “The fact that cats are able to become pregnant at 5 or even 4 months of age, combined with the fact that many people who would not allow their dog to roam loose allow their cat to do so, makes accidental litters a tragic but completely avoidable problem,” writes Ruth Steinberger, executive director of Spay FIRST!

HuffPost (10/2)

Panleukopenia claims 50 cats at N.C. shelter

September 6, 2017

Panleukopenia claims 50 cats at N.C. shelter

At least 50 cats at a northeastern North Carolina animal shelter have died of panleukopenia since a kitten died of the disease in July. Kittens are especially susceptible to the virus, which spreads through feces, urine and bowls and is difficult to kill, said veterinarian Leigh Rigler, who has been helping the shelter diagnose and manage the virus.

WAVY-TV (Portsmouth, Va.) (9/5)

Persistent panting could be a sign of lung, heart disorder in cats

August 24, 2017

Persistent panting could be a sign of lung, heart disorder in cats

Some cats pant infrequently as a cooling mechanism or when they are anxious, but persistent panting can be a sign of congestive heart failure, allergic bronchitis, asthma and other disorders, says veterinarian Aimee Simpson, medical director of VCA Cat Hospital of Philadelphia. Cats whose panting is persistent should be examined by a veterinarian, who may order chest X-rays or perform an echocardiogram, Dr. Simpson says.

Catster (8/23)

Uterine infection is a serious condition in dogs, cats

August 22, 2017

Uterine infection is a serious condition in dogs, cats

Pyometra, or uterine infection, may become evident two to three months after a dog — or, rarely, a cat — has its last estrus, “and it is a true veterinary emergency,” said veterinarian Gary Brummet, chief of primary care service at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Pyometra occurs most frequently in intact dogs between 6 and 10 years old, can result in sepsis if untreated and is prevented only by spaying.

The News-Gazette (Champaign-Urbana, Ill.) (8/21)