KANSAS, Spring Hill repeals breed ban

November 18, 2012

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/StopBsl/~3/yQE0Bl1yVpk/?utm_source=feedbur

ner&utm_medium=email

Spring Hill Kansas has repealed their ban on ³pit bull dogs.² The old law, which was passed in 2008, defined a pit bull dog as follows:

Any pit bull dog.  (1) ³Pit bull dog² means:

  1. The bull terrier breed of dog;
  2. The Staffordshire bull terrier breed of dog; c. The American pit bull terrier breed of dog; d. The American Staffordshire terrier breed of dog; e. Dogs of mixed breed or of other breeds than above-listed which breed or mixed breed is known as pit bulls, pit bull dogs or pit bull terriers; f. Any dog which has the appearance and characteristics of being predominantly of the breeds of Bull terrier, Staffordshire bull terrier, American pit bull terrier, American Staffordshire terrier; any other breed commonly known as pit bulls, pit bull dogs or pit bull terriers; or a combination of any of these breeds.

 

 

The penalties for violation were severe, with fines of up to $2,000 and up to 179 days in jail.  This ordinance was rare, in that it included the reasoning for the original passage of the ban.

 

³1. That as a breed of dogs, all pit bulls are inherently dangerous.

  1. That the possession of pit bulls within the City poses a significant threat to the public¹s health, safety and welfare.
  2. That numerous instances of attacks by pit bulls have occurred against members of this community and attacks by pit bulls in surrounding communities have resulted in serious injuries.
  3. That protective measures by pit bull owners are inadequate to protect the public from attacks by these animals.²

 

 

On November 13th, the city council approved the final reading of an ordinance to repeal the breed ban.  The issue was originally raised at a previous meeting and the city took on the task of investigating the issue.

Topeka, Kansas¹ dangerous dog law was selected for review.  The council notes <http://www.springhillks.com/ArchiveCenter/ViewFile/Item/1255>

mention Topeka¹s breed neutrality, and the issues they had found with their former breed discriminatory law and the cost to tax payers.

Topeka had a breed discriminatory law that was repealed in 2010 <http://cjonline.com/news/local/2010-09-28/city_approves_animal_ordinance>.

It makes sense that the Spring Hill Council would look at the information from there, considering that Topeka had a committee that spent substantial time and energy reworking the animal control ordinances.

The breed neutral law goes into effect after its publication in the local news.  The new law will prohibit any dog that is declared dangerous, based on the actions of the animal, and not it¹s perceived

KANSAS, puppy mills: violations without citations raise concern

 

May 14, 2014

KS: Puppy mills: Violations without citations raise concern

http://cjonline.com/news/2014-05-13/puppy-mills-violations-without-citations-raise-concern http://tinyurl.com/kd5s57k

Puppy mills: Violations without citations raise concern More than 200 inspections came back clean, but with dirty conditions noted Posted: May 13, 2014 – 8:46pm

Search a database of pet facility inspections

Facility’s name

Owner’s name

Address

City Passed inspection

Number of animals

Online Database by Caspio

By Aly Van Dyke aly.vandyke@cjonline.com

Pet animal breeding facilities with multiple violations from the Kansas Department of Agirculture aren’t the only ones having trouble complying with animal health and safety guidelines.

More than 200 KDA inspections of licensed breeders in fiscal year 2013 recorded no violations. However, the notes section, at the back of the reports, often was riddled with details: ■

Jan. 29, 2013: Kerstone Shepherds, Abilene: “Three pens have feces smeared throughout. Clean pens as often as needed to keep dogs out of the contamination. Clean three feeders.” Owner Alicia Lips said, “of course” she had fixed the issue.

“Although it’s a handful to run my farm virtually alone, I always strive to keep things up to standard but if they ever inspect and ask for something to be repaired or cleaned or changed, I act quickly to be sure it goes above and beyond for them,” she said. “My dogs are my love and my passion, I hate considering them as ‘business’!”…

KANSAS, El Dorado talks on repeal turns to talk on regulating more breeds

April 23, 2014

Distressing news out of El Dorado, KS.   What started out as talks to repeal a ban on pit bulls has turned to talks on regulating MORE breeds. http://blessthebullys.wordpress.com/2014/04/23/talks-on-repeal-turn-to-talks-on-more-regulation-in-el-dorado-kansas/

KANSAS, HSUS to rally animal welfare legislation at the Statehouse

February 5, 2014

This is WHY we need to kill all the bills and NOT negotiate with AR enemy thru exemptions, these exemptions can always be removed, or AR comes back and ads more species to the existing ban list, KILL BILLS, simple like that, Kansas is already a ban state in regard to many exotics.

The group is lobbying this session to expand the state’s list of dangerous animals prohibited from being kept as pets, as well as revisions to the state’s Pet Animal Act that governs breeders of such traditional pets as dogs and cats

http://cjonline.com/news/2014-02-05/humane-society-united-states-rally-animal-welfare-legislation

Humane Society of the United States to rally for animal welfare legislation

Group also plans to present awards to Atchison County officers who rescued big cats

Andy Marso

andy.marso@cjonline.com

The Kansas branch of the Humane Society of the United States hopes a daylong rally at the Statehouse next week will jumpstart animal welfare legislation.

Midge Grinstead, the director of the branch, will host the rally which begins at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the Docking State Office Building auditorium. Grinstead said she is setting up a meeting with legislators for those who preregister on the Humane Society’s website.

The group is lobbying this session to expand the state’s list of dangerous animals prohibited from being kept as pets, as well as revisions to the state’s Pet Animal Act that governs breeders of such traditional pets as dogs and cats.

“There’s animal welfare items on the list,” Grinstead said. “They haven’t changed since 1989, and they were very minimal to begin with.”

Grinstead’s group plans to lobby for licensed breeders to be required to provide a continuous water supply for their animals (current law requires water every 12 hours, regardless of weather conditions) and access to heated and cooled facilities.

A member of the Kansas Federation of Animal Owners said in October that such changes place an unnecessary regulatory burden on responsible pet breeders and that his group would oppose the legislation.

Another Humane Society lobbying initiative would allow animal shelters to set up temporary “mobile adoption” booths at such places as retail outlets and pet supply stores, as opposed to being constrained to adopting out animals only from the shelter premises.

Grinstead said her group also would like to bring Kansas law in line with much of the rest of the nation in allowing adoption of cats who are positive for Feline Immunodeficiency Syndrome but are asymptomatic.

She said most states allow such adoptions because the virus can be well-managed with veterinary care. Kansas, however, doesn’t, which forces shelters to either euthanize or hold for life every FIV-positive cat they receive.

Grinstead said the Humane Society also will lobby for a second bill that would ban Kansans from owning primates and wolves as pets.

“They’re not regulated in Kansas at all,” Grinstead said. “We don’t think people should be able to own them and keep them in their backyard.”

Grinstead said the group will push for a complete ban, because the permitting system set up for other dangerous animals, such as big cats, has proven ineffective.

As an example she pointed to a backyard menagerie seized in Atchison County in May that included bobcats, mountain lions and a tiger.

The animals were kept in kennels, and a neighbor told a Kansas City television station he feared for his children’s safety.

Atchison County Sheriff Jack Laurie reported that the property owner, Matthew Baker, was combative — and in possession of methamphetamine — when they came to seize the animals.

Grinstead said her organization assisted Laurie’s office in carrying out the seizure and found some animals starving and others already dead. She estimated the cost of feeding and transporting those that remained to zoos and animal sanctuaries was $30,000.

Laurie and Undersheriff Joe Butner will be honored with a national award at the Humane Society rally Tuesday. Grinstead said she believes it is the first time anyone from Kansas has won the award, and it is well-deserved.

“They really stood up and came forward even when their county attorney wasn’t really on board,” Grinstead said. “They went all out to make sure the animals were taken care of.”

Andy Marso can be reached at Capital: (785) 233-7470; Office: (785) 295-5619 or andy.marso@cjonline.com. Follow Andy on Twitter @andymarso.

 

By Andy Marso

andy.marso@cjonline.com

The Kansas branch of the Humane Society of the United States hopes a daylong rally at the Statehouse next week will jumpstart animal welfare legislation.

Midge Grinstead, the director of the branch, will host the rally which begins at 9 a.m. Tuesday at the Docking State Office Building auditorium. Grinstead said she is setting up a meeting with legislators for those who preregister on the Humane Society’s website.

The group is lobbying this session to expand the state’s list of dangerous animals prohibited from being kept as pets, as well as revisions to the state’s Pet Animal Act that governs breeders of such traditional pets as dogs and cats.

“There’s animal welfare items on the list,” Grinstead said. “They haven’t changed since 1989, and they were very minimal to begin with.”

Grinstead’s group plans to lobby for licensed breeders to be required to provide a continuous water supply for their animals (current law requires water every 12 hours, regardless of weather conditions) and access to heated and cooled facilities.

A member of the Kansas Federation of Animal Owners said in October that such changes place an unnecessary regulatory burden on responsible pet breeders and that his group would oppose the legislation.

Another Humane Society lobbying initiative would allow animal shelters to set up temporary “mobile adoption” booths at such places as retail outlets and pet supply stores, as opposed to being constrained to adopting out animals only from the shelter premises.

Grinstead said her group also would like to bring Kansas law in line with much of the rest of the nation in allowing adoption of cats who are positive for Feline Immunodeficiency Syndrome but are asymptomatic.

She said most states allow such adoptions because the virus can be well-managed with veterinary care. Kansas, however, doesn’t, which forces shelters to either euthanize or hold for life every FIV-positive cat they receive.

Grinstead said the Humane Society also will lobby for a second bill that would ban Kansans from owning primates and wolves as pets.

“They’re not regulated in Kansas at all,” Grinstead said. “We don’t think people should be able to own them and keep them in their backyard.”

Grinstead said the group will push for a complete ban, because the permitting system set up for other dangerous animals, such as big cats, has proven ineffective.

As an example she pointed to a backyard menagerie seized in Atchison County in May that included bobcats, mountain lions and a tiger.

The animals were kept in kennels, and a neighbor told a Kansas City television station he feared for his children’s safety.

Atchison County Sheriff Jack Laurie reported that the property owner, Matthew Baker, was combative — and in possession of methamphetamine — when they came to seize the animals.

Grinstead said her organization assisted Laurie’s office in carrying out the seizure and found some animals starving and others already dead. She estimated the cost of feeding and transporting those that remained to zoos and animal sanctuaries was $30,000.

Laurie and Undersheriff Joe Butner will be honored with a national award at the Humane Society rally Tuesday. Grinstead said she believes it is the first time anyone from Kansas has won the award, and it is well-deserved.

“They really stood up and came forward even when their county attorney wasn’t really on board,” Grinstead said. “They went all out to make sure the animals were taken care of.”

Andy Marso can be reached at Capital: (785) 233-7470; Office: (785) 295-5619 or andy.marso@cjonline.com.
Follow Andy on Twitter @andymarso.

 

KANSAS, Garden City to revisit breed discrimatory law

December 12, 2013

A Garden City attorney has asked the city commission to re-evaluate the cities breed discriminatory law, which was passed in 2002.
The current law labels the American Pit Bull Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier or American Staffordshire Terrier, and mixed breeds that have “the appearance of being predominantly one of those three breeds” as automatically vicious.
This designation carries with it requirements that must be met if the dog is to be kept in the city. From the current city code:

“The owner of a vicious dog shall be subject to the following requirements:

(1)Confinement. All vicious dogs shall be securely confined indoors or in an enclosed and locked pen or structure upon the premises of the owner. The pen or structure must have minimum dimensions of five feet by ten feet and must have secure sides and a secure top attached to the sides. If no bottom is secured to the sides, the sides must be embedded into the ground no less than two feet. All pens or structures must be adequately lighted and kept clean and sanitary. The enclosure must also protect the dog from the elements.

(2)Leash and muzzle. The owner of a vicious dog shall not allow the dog to go outside its kennel, pen, or structure unless the dog is muzzled, restrained by a chain or leash not more than four feet in length, and under the physical control of a person. The muzzle must not cause injury to the dog or interfere with its vision or respiration but must prevent the dog from biting any human or animal.

(3)Signs. The owner of a vicious dog shall display in a prominent place on the owner’s premises a clearly visible warning sign indicating that there is a vicious dog on the premises. The sign must be readable from the public highway, street, or thoroughfare. The owner shall also display a sign with a symbol warning children of the presence of a vicious dog. Similar signs shall be posted on the dog’s kennel, pen, or enclosed structure.”

These things are also required of dogs, who based on their behavior, have been declared vicious. The request is to remove the breed based language from the law, leaving the vicious dog ordinance in place.
City officials have agreed that since the law had not been evaluated in over ten years that it would be worth evaluating now.
The city attorney is drafting changes to the ordinance and the changes will be brought forward at an upcoming meeting that has yet to be given a date.

Residents are encouraged to reach out to the commission to support a repeal. Please write to encourage the commission to remove the breed discriminatory language and to strengthen the breed neutral portion of the law to keep the community safe. There are ways in which the breed neutral portion of the law can be strengthened. For example, there is currently no definition of a potentially dangerous dog. A dog is either vicious or it isn’t. Having more nuanced categories allows officials to do something about a dog that may not be vicious but is not being kept in the safest way possible in the community. A reckless owner ordinance would also be a fantastic replacement for the breed discriminatory law, because it puts continued responsibility on the owner, even after they may get rid of a dog that has been declared vicious.

Be polite, factual and thank the commission for being willing to discuss the issue.

dan.fankhauser@gardencityks.us,
roy.cessna@gardencityks.us,
mdale1@cox.net,
janet.doll@gardencityks.us,
chris.law@gardencityks.us

Filed under: Proposal to Repeal, Uncategorized
www.stopbsl.com

Kansas, Topeka: Animal Rights advocates seek more stringent regulations

http://tinyurl.com/ofs52ug

October 12, 2013

Animal rights advocates seek more stringent regulations to protect pets

By Scott Rothschild

Topeka — Animal rights advocates today called on legislators to enact changes to state law to protect pets in the face of reports that Kansas is one of the nation’s leaders in so-called puppy mill operations.

Midge Grinstead, state director for The Humane Society of the United States, said the state has “a serious enforcement problem.”

From 1999 through June 2011, the state seized or received on consent 10,451 animals from licensed and unlicensed operations. Fifty-one percent of those animals were from unlicensed facilities, she said…..

She said current regulations are inadequate to ensure animals in crowded conditions have adequate water, are subject to proper temperatures, and given enough room to move around.

But several kennel owners said they felt some of the proposed changes would add unnecessary state regulations to their businesses, whichalready are licensed by the federal U.S. Department of Agriculture.

And they said the worst offenders were those who already are operating outside current laws.Several committee members said they didn’t see the need to regulate “hobby” breeders or animal training businesses…..

Kansas, Topeka agencies warn of algae threat to hunting dogs

Agencies warn of algae threat to hunting dogs

September 30, 2013

TOPEKA, Kansas (AP) – Kansas waterfowl hunters who use dogs are being urged this fall to keep the canines out of waterways contaminated with harmful blue-green algae.

Officials with the state’s health and wildlife departments say the dogs that drink or swim in contaminated water may become extremely ill or die. Eating dried algae along shorelines can have the same results.

The agencies caution that dangerous blue-green algae blooms can remain a threat to humans and pets through October or later.

Symptoms in dogs usually appear within 30 minutes, including vomiting, diarrhea, difficulty breathing and general weakness. Hunters whose dogs appear sick should contact a veterinarian immediately.

Human exposure can cause similar symptoms, including headaches, fever and rashes.

Kansas, Emporia shelter under quarantine for outbreak distemper

More than 60 dogs have died since February

Posted: September 24, 2013 – 6:50am

By The Associated Press

EMPORIA — The Emporia animal shelter is under quarantine because of an apparent outbreak of distemper among animals at the facility.

A temporary intake center has been set up at the Lyon County Fairgrounds in response to the outbreak, which has killed more than 60 dogs since February. Veterinarians say early test results confirmed the illness was distemper. The Capital Area Animal Rescue Team will operate the temporary shelter for at least three weeks.

Animal Shelter manager Peggy Derrick says the remaining dogs at the animal shelter are healthy.

Emporia veterinarian Floyd Dorsey told KAKE-TV (http://bit.ly/18VlgHP) that officials suspected distemper from the beginning.

“We’ve had 26 dogs euthanized since the start of the month,” Dorsey said. “My biggest scare was that we had some new type of virus that was not going to be protected from the vaccine.”

Dorsey suspects the outbreak started with unvaccinated animals being taken to the shelter.

“It’s definitely a situation where the dogs are not protected. Had they been protected and vaccinated, I don’t think we would have seen this,” he said.

Dorsey says getting dogs vaccinated and staying up to date with the shots can not only save a pet’s life, but it will keep other dogs healthy too.