Domestic animals could harbor potent drug-resistance gene, study finds

August 17, 2016

Domestic animals could harbor potent drug-resistance gene, study finds

In the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, researchers in China report that a pet store worker was infected with a form of E. coli carrying the multi-drug-resistant mcr-1 gene, and four dogs and two cats there also carried the strain. The six bacterial isolates researchers identified were resistant to multiple antibiotics, and the authors said the findings suggest the drug-resistant bacteria may be passed between companion animals and humans.

NBC News (8/16)

Dieting cats don’t hold a grudge, study finds

February 17, 2016

Dieting cats don’t hold a grudge, study finds

Cornell University veterinarians studied whether overweight cats placed on a diet for eight weeks would show behavior changes, finding that they do, but not the grudge owners might fear. The majority of cats lost weight, and they tended to be more cuddly, findings that veterinarians hope will reassure owners who tend to use food to show love. Veterinarians say it’s best to engage other feline senses to connect. “Maybe owners will now be more likely to do what’s healthy for their cats,” said veterinarian Bonnie Beaver, executive director of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) (2/16)

fatigued cattle syndrome not caused by beta agonist use, study finds

December 18, 2015

Fatigued cattle syndrome not caused by beta agonist use, study finds
Beta agonists are not the cause of fatigued cattle syndrome, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Larger cattle that are moved more quickly through transportation and processing plants are more prone to the syndrome, the researchers found when looking at animals who did not receive beta agonists. Veterinarians at Kansas State and Iowa State worked with researchers from Texas Tech on the study. Beef magazine online (12/17)

plasma, serum glucose test more precise than whole blood test, study finds

June 17, 2015

Plasma, serum glucose test more precise than whole blood test, study finds University of Pennsylvania veterinarians found that measurement of glucose using serum or plasma is more accurate than testing whole blood. “It’s widely known that glucometer readings come with a degree of inaccuracy, and until now we’ve just lived with it,” said veterinarian Rebecka Hess. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, could have implications for humans with diabetes. PhysOrg.com (6/16)

plants may contribute to spread of prion diseases, study finds

June 2, 2015

Plants may contribute to spread of prion diseases, study finds Plants may be an environmental source of pathogenic prions, according to research reported in Cell Reports. They found evidence of prion uptake in plants, and hamsters that were fed the prion-carrying plants became sick. Prion diseases are known to infect a number of animals, including humans, cows and sheep, and pathogenic prions are uncommonly hardy. “We have to be careful about the potential dangers of this,” lead author Claudio Soto said. FoodSafetyNews.com (6/1)

Marker could signal feline renal disease months to years earlier, study finds

November 21, 2014

Marker could signal feline renal disease months to years earlier, study finds

A newly identified biomarker known as SDMA can be used to identify kidney disease in cats an average of 17 months earlier than standard tests, according to research by veterinarians at Oregon State University and IDEXX Laboratories published in The Veterinary Journal. “Damage from it is irreversible, but this is an important advance, in that we should be able to identify the problem earlier and use special diets to slow the disease,” said OSU veterinarian Jean Hall. PhysOrg.com (11/20)

 

IV fluids important even in short surgeries, study finds

October 17, 2014

IV fluids important even in short surgeries, study finds Intravenous fluids affect blood pressure and flow even during short surgeries such as a spay or neuter, according to research by veterinarian Deborah Silverstein of the University of Pennsylvania. The study, reported in the American Journal of Veterinary Research, found vessels greater than 20 micrometers had increased density and flow in animals given the most fluid, compared with those receiving none. They also monitored blood pressure and noted that one-third of the animals experienced a drop in blood pressure during the surgery. “That just shows that monitoring blood pressure and having fluid support is important,” Dr. Silverstein said. MedicalXpress.com (10/15)

 

 

Pathogens are most abundant in raw pet foods, jerky treats, study finds

September 8, 2014

Pathogens are most abundant in raw pet foods, jerky treats, study finds Over 1,000 pet food samples, including dry, moist and raw foods, were tested for the presence of bacterial pathogens over a two-year period in a recent study. While contamination occurred in all types of pet food, bacterial contamination was more common in raw pet foods and jerky treats, according to the study. Testing focused on salmonella, listeria, Shiga toxin-producing strains of E. coli and E. coli O157:H7. The FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine will use the results to focus future testing. Food Poisoning Bulletin (9/6)

TEXAS dogs have Chagas disease parasite study finds

July 18, 2014

Dogs in Texas have Chagas disease parasite, study findsVeterinarian Sarah Hamer and colleagues at Texas A&M University found that 9% of dogs tested in the state carried the Chagas disease parasite. Transmission from dogs to humans is unlikely because the disease can be spread only indirectly, through kissing bugs that must bite the dogs in early stages of the infection. The disease is more common in Latin America, and most people in the U.S. who have the illness likely contracted it in other countries. National Public Radio/Goats and Soda blog (7/1